Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 6th Global Healthcare Nutritionists and Dietician annual Conference Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.

Day 1 :

  • Healthcare

Session Introduction

Shakiba Javadi

Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran

Title: Spreading Rhinoplasty in Iran as a social phenomenon: causes and moderators in a qualitative study
Speaker
Biography:

Shakiba Javadi has completed her MD- MPH at the age of 26 from Tehran University of Medical Sciences in Iran. She is interested to behavioral medicine, qualitative studies and society base approach to different behavioral diseases. She has 5 paper in this category that are under publishing.

Abstract:

Rhinoplasty is a common procedures in celebrities all over the world but in Iran as many as 200000 Iranian, mostly women undergo cosmetic surgery each year. Because of socioeconomic influence of Rhinoplasty on individual's life, provocative factors of this issue may be discussable. Our aim in this study was to find out causes of such interest in Iranian and investigate if there is a comprehensive behavioral model which could predict Rhinoplasty in this society? A qualitative approach was used. 26 applicants whom didn’t have psychological problems participated in semi-structural in depth individual interviews. Data collection followed by a conventional content theory and the analysis guided by thematic analysis. The leading cause of this behavior is divided into 2 categories: individual and social motivators. Individual motivators are attitudes about Rhinoplasty consist of attaining beautiful appearance to attract men for single girls or divorced women, feeling the need to change the appearance and making changes in psychosocial states. Social motivators are divided into subjective norms which are formed by observing significant others or direct encouragement by entourages and facilitating factors consist of media exposure and low cost of Rhinoplasty in Iran. By comparing and substitution these motivators in different health behavioral models, theory of planned behavior by emphasizing the interaction between personal determinants and situation as well as considering the role of facilitators and inhibitors factors in an intention represents appropriate model for Rhinoplasty .

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Baack completed her PhD in Global Health in 2011 with a dissertation focus on Nurses’ perceived readiness for disasters. She currently serves as the Chief of Nursing Education at VA North Texas Health Care System where she oversees the nursing education of approximately 1800 nursing staff and over 1200 students annually. She has presented both posters and podium presentations at local, state, national and international forums. She is a published author and her article Nurses Preparedness and Perceived Competence in Managing Disasters has been published in the Journal of Nursing Scholarship. She is an avid reader and loves to learn from others.

Abstract:

Natural and human-induced disasters and the rise of disease(s) have been increasing in prevalence and severity. On average a disaster takes place somewhere in the world every day (Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization, 2000). It is now more imperative than ever that Healthcare leaders and executives possess an overt understanding of need for disaster training and mitigation. There is no doubt that Nurses comprise the largest segment of the Healthcare workforce, but do they feel prepared to mitigate and respond to the detrimental effects and aftermath of disasters? A 58-item Disaster Readiness Questionnaire was used to survey hospital-based nurses from communities in Texas. The data were collected from a sample of 653 nurses. Findings revealed that most nurses are not confident in their abilities to respond to major disaster events. The nurses who were confident were more likely to have had actual prior experience in disasters and/or shelters. Self-regulation of behavior (motivation) was a significant predictor of perceived nurse competence to manage disasters only in regard to the nurse’s willingness to assume the risk of involvement in a disaster situation. Since nurses are often involved in planning, mitigation, response, and recovery aspects of disasters, they should actively seek opportunities to participate in actual disaster events, mock drills, and further educational opportunities specific to disaster preparedness. Administrators must support and encourage disaster preparedness education of nurses to promote hospital readiness to provide community care delivery in the event of a disaster situation.

Speaker
Biography:

 

Willoughby is a third year PhD student at The University of Auckland. She has a Bachelor of Nursing degree with First Class Honors, a Bachelor of Arts degree in Film, TV and Media Studies, and is a Registered Nurse with over five years experience in accident and medical care within a primary healthcare setting. Willoughby’s PhD is funded by Health Workforce NZ’s Advanced Trainee Fellowship Scheme (ATF Scheme). This initiative is aimed at assisting exceptional advanced health professional trainees to study in a priority specialty area. The scheme bonds her to The University of Auckland as a full-time lecturer and researcher at the completion of the PhD. Willoughby has also been awarded The University of Auckland Doctoral Scholarship 2013-2016.

Abstract:

 

Background: Since the recession began in 2007 employment rates of Registered Nurses (RNs) in New Zealand (NZ) have grown. The assumption is that many increased their hours or returned to the profession to supplement their family’s income. It is predicted that as the economy continues to recover the nursing workforce will reach critically low numbers due to these same RNs reducing their hours or leaving the profession because of their family’s improved financial circumstances, at the same time as the ageing nursing workforce nears retirement, the ageing population is increasing demand and many RNs are emigrating to pursue opportunities overseas. Solutions should focus on the motivations of RNs and incentives to retain them. Objective: To provide comprehensive data on a large cohort of RNs from primary, secondary and tertiary workplace settings and from a variety of generational cohorts, in regards to their perspectives on their work conditions, how this fits in with their personal lives, and what their plans are for the future. Results will inform the development of a new model of RN intention to leave as well as provide health care planners with information for strategies that seek to motivate RNs to remain engaged in the profession despite their changing circumstances, in the hope of building a high functioning stable nursing workforce. Methods: Qualitative data were collected from 25 semi-structured interviews with RNs, nurse leaders, and key stakeholders. Results of thematic analysis informed the development of a survey that was sent to a randomized sample of RNs across NZ and was advertised in the Nursing Council of NZ newsletter. To date, over 2,500 RNs have completed the survey. Quantitative data will be analyzed using Structural Equation Modeling. Phase I Results: The literature review and thematic analysis in Phase I resulted in the development of five key themes that influence RN intention to leave. Job Demands includes the variables of role overload (quantitative demands; emotional demands; nurse-patient ratio; skill mix; task delegation; patient complexity), personal harm (physical, emotional, verbal), and returning to work. Personal demands include the variable work-life conflict. Job Resources includes variables of social support (supervisor support; colleague support), organizational support (kinship responsiveness; schedule flexibility), autonomy, professional development (training and career progression), and reward (intrinsic: respect and recognition; extrinsic: pay). Personal resources includes the variables psychological capital and value fit (value congruence; career orientation; image of nursing). Finally, Context and controls includes demographics, positive and negative affect, and economic climate.

  • Mental Health
Speaker
Biography:

Narumi Fujino is working as a faculty in Saga University.Narumi Fujino completed Ph.D. in Health Science from Hiroshima University.

 

Abstract:

The outcome of outreach support is the decrease in rehospitalization of persons with mental disorders and the enhancement of their settlement. in the community. It is expected that outreach support can enable medical institutions to reduce the number of beds occupied by providing methods of continuation of “independent life on their own” for persons with mental disorders in the community. In the future, it is important to provide comprehensive multidisciplinary outreach support that takes into consideration a person’s individuality.

  • Infections and Diseases

Session Introduction

Carlos Fernando

Faculty of Medicine, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Colombia.

Title: Imiquimod for anogenital warts in non-immunocompromised adults
Speaker
Biography:

Carlos Grillo-Ardila has completed his DipObst at the age of 28 years from National University Of Colombia and MSc in Clinical Epidemiology from the same University. He is Professor of The Gynecology and Obstetrics Department and The Clinical Research Institute of The National University of Colombia. He is Co-ordinating Editor of Sexually Transmitted Infection Cochrane Group, Associated Editor of The Cochrane Clinical Answer and Associated Editor of the Colombian Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

Abstract:

The imiquimod was superior to placebo in achieving complete and partial regression. When compared with placebo, the effects of imiquimod on recurrence, appearance of new warts and frequency of systemic adverse reactions were imprecise. Imiquimod led to more local adverse reactions and pain. Two trials compared imiquimod versus any other patient-applied treatment. The effects of imiquimod on complete regression, partial regression, recurrence or the presence of local adverse reactions were imprecise. Systemic adverse reactions were less frequent with imiquimod. Finally, two trials compared imiquimod with any other provider-administered treatment. The imiquimod did not have a lower frequency of complete regression. Imiquimod led to a lower rate of recurrence during six-month follow-up but this did not translate in to a lower recurrence from six to 12 months. The benefits and harms of imiquimod compared with placebo should be regarded with caution due to the risk of bias. The evidence for many of the outcomes that show imiquimod and patient-applied treatment confer similar benefits but fewer systematic reactions with the Imiquimod.

  • Chronic Diseases

Session Introduction

Dr. Kalpana Dash

Professor and chief of Diabetes & Endocrinology at Apollo Hospitals,Indai

Title: Recent advances in Graves’ disease
Speaker
Biography:

I am a professor and chief of Diabetes & Endocrinology at Apollo Hospitals, Hospitals Bilaspur and Apollo Sugar Clinic Raipur. I have 23 years of experience in my field. I am Member of American Diabetic Association (ADA), USA. I am Life member of American Endocrine Society (AES), USA. i am Editorial Board Member of Apollo Medical Journal, official journal published by Elsevier publisher. I have attended more than 45 National and International conferences.

Abstract:

Graves' disease is an autoimmune disease classically presents with hyperthyroidism with diffuse goiter, infiltrative ophthalmology characterized by inflammation and involvement of intra-orbital structures, dermopathy also known as pretibial myxomatosis, and extra thyroidal features like weight loss, tachycardia, perspiration, tremor and sometimes rare involvement of the nails, fingers and long bones known as acropachy. Graves' disease is commonest cause of hyperthyroidism and represents 50–80% of cases of hyperthyroidism. Graves’ disease is common amongst women, smokers and associated with other autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes mellitus, rheumatoid arthritis and collagen vascular diseases. It is also common amongst patients with family history of thyroid autoimmunity. It is an auto immune disease, in genetically susceptible individuals in whom auto antibodies are produced and result in thyroid hormone excess and glandular hyperplasia. Graves' disease reduces quality of life3, can cause tachyarrhythmia, severe weight loss, psychosis, osteoporosis, cardiac failure and sudden cardiac death. Organ specific symptoms can cause thyroid associated ophthalmology (TAO) and can risk the vision. TAO can deteriorate following radioactive iodine ablation. Tests to diagnose Graves' disease include thyroid function tests particularly ultra sensitive TSH ( thyroid stimulating hormone) assay, the measurement of free thyroxine (T4) and free triiodothyronine (T3), both of which are usually elevated in Graves' hyperthyroidism, radionuclide thyroid scintigraphy (99mTC-pertechnetate thyroid scintigraphy) demonstrating diffusely increased uptake in Graves' disease. It is helpful in distinguishing Graves’ disease from thyroiditis and autonomously hyper functioning nodule. Measurement of serum TSH-receptor antibodies is helpful in confirming the diagnosis of Graves' disease. At times patients with Graves' disease may present with sub clinical hyperthyroidism, characterized by suppression of TSH and T3 and T4 remaining within normal range. Other antibodies, including thyroid peroxidase (TPO) and thyroglobulin (Tg) antibodies, may be significantly elevated but are not specific to Graves' disease. Prompt treatment is important. There are three treatment modalities available for Graves' hyperthyroidism including a course of antithyroid drugs (thionamides) for 12-18 months. In case of relapse, radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy or surgery are other options. In Australia, UK and Europe patients receive an initial course of thalidomide therapy prior to the consideration of RAI. However in North American, RAI is the treatment of choice5. Surgery is considered in selective patients such as large goiter, contraindications to RAI therapy, relapse with anti thyroid drugs and nodular Graves’ disease. Surgery has the highest long-term remission rate (95%) but is not without risks.

Cristian Cazac

University of Medicine and Pharmacy “Carol Davila,” Bucharest, Romania

Title: Aspects of Diagnosis and Treatment of Aneurismal Bone Cysts in Romania and U.S.A. : A Case Study
Speaker
Biography:

Cristian Cazac is a 5th year medical student enrolled at the University of Medicine and Pharmacy “Carol Davila” in Bucharest, Romania. He has been the class president for two years. He has presented at two medical congresses and has attended a total of 5. He has published 4 medical articles and has been the consultant student editor for the medical journal titled Journal of Medicine and Life. During the summer months, he participates in electives, observerships, volunteerships, and medical research at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore, Sinai Hospital of Baltimore, and Medstar Franklin Square Medical Center.

Abstract:

A 19 year old male Romanian resident presented to Sinai Hospital of Baltimore for the treatment of an aneurismal bone cyst located in the proximal left tibia. The patient previously consulted 3 orthopaedic surgeons in Romania. After evaluation of x-ray films, ultrasound, and blood tests the Romanian physicians concluded the absence of disease. After a 4th office visit, an MRI was performed which revealed an osteolitic tumor in the proximal left tibia suggestive of a giant cell tumor with dimensions of 61/43 mm. The Romanian orthopaedic surgeons recommended partial join replacement. The patient refused treatment and went to the U.S.A. for consultation at John’s Hopkins Hospital and Sinai Hospital. After performing an MRI, bone scan, x-ray films, and blood panel the lesion was suggested to be an aneurismal bone cyst. The recommended treatment was curettage, bone allotransplantation, phenol irrigation, and insertion of a fibula segment. The patient remained at Sinai Hospital for treatment. The histopathological findings were difficult to differentiate between a giant cell tumor and an aneurismal bone cyst. The samples were sent for re-evaluation to an outside center which confirmed that the lesion was an aneurismal bone cyst. At three years follow up, the patient’s repeat x-ray films show no sign of recurrent disease.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Dianwen Ju gained his Ph.D. degree from the department of immunology in Second Military Medical University at 1999, and now he is a professor and director of Department of Microbiological and Biochemical Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, Fudan University. He is an expert in the field of bio-therapy, autophagy, cancer therapy and immunotherapy, while he has published over 80 papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway is evolutionary conserved and acts as a key player in early embryonic development. Hh is largely activated in most of tumors like non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) and regarded as a potential target for NSCLC therapy. Abnormally, treatment of Vismodegib, an Hh inhibitor, failed to exhibit a positive outcome in NSCLCs due to the unclear mechanisms. In this study, we reported the critical role of autophagy in the therapy-resistance in NSCLCs under the treatment of Vismodegib. We found that inhibition of Hh pathway by Vismodegib showed limited effect on the growth of NSCLC cells. At this period, autophagy and autophagic flux were triggered after Vismodegib treatment, while inhibition of autophagy sensitized the NSCLC cells to the treatment of Vismodegib with increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activated Caspase 3. Furthermore, combination use of Vismodegib and CQ in vivo also resulted in the generation of ROS and activation of Caspase 3 in xenograft NSCLC tissues, which finally caused the necrosis in the tumors. Our results demonstrated that autophagy protected the NSCLCs from Vismodegib by restricting the production of ROS and highlighted an approach for future treatment of NSCLC by combination use of Vismodegib and autophagy inhibitors.

  • Healthcare Administration
Speaker
Biography:

Tracy Teo has completed her Bachelor of Health Sciences from University of Sydney in 2004. She is currently working in National University Health System, Singapore as ACTION Care Coordinator.

Abstract:

The aim of this project is to evaluate effectiveness of referral process in reducing the length of stay in hospital. This is a retrospective study utilising the convenience sampling method to analyse the impact on length of stay in hospital. This is obtained through our patients' database from November 2014 till August 2015. In this study, we are comparing the patients' length of stay between the fast track pathway cases versus non fast track pathway cases. The inclusion criterias for the pathway: i. Hip Fracture Fast -Track, patients: a) who are clinically stable b) on partial weight-bearing / full weight-bearing status c) with good rehabilitation potential d) with viable care plan post discharge e) agreeable community hospital placement during pre-operative counselling ii. Stroke Fast - Track, patients: a) who are clinically stable b) with viable care plan post discharge c) who are able to obey 1-2 step command and able to ambulate premorbid (regardless of type of walking aids) d) with fair static and dynamic sitting balance e) able to perform standing with assistance. The review of these data proven to be beneficial to the patients in reducing the length of stay, thus we will be able to upscale these fast track process to other disciplines in the hospital.