Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend Euro Health Care and Fitness Summit Valencia, Spain.

Day 2 :

OMICS International Euro Health Care 2015 International Conference Keynote Speaker Josep M Picas  photo
Biography:

Josep M Picas, MD of University of Barcelona has done his Diploma from ESADE Business School of Barcelona. He is the President of the European Association of Healthcare IT Managers. He has been Director of the Primary Care of Barcelona City and CIO at the Hospital de St. Pau. Now he is promoting Adaptive HS.

Abstract:

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a nervous system disease that affects the brain and spinal cord. It damages the myelin sheath, the material that surrounds and protects the nerve cells. This damage slows down or blocks messages between the brain and the body, leading to the symptoms of MS. They can include among others muscle weakness, trouble with coordination and balance. This progressive disease affects women more than men. The patients are usually diagnosed between 20 and 40 years old. Medicines may slow down the evolution of symptoms and physical and occupational therapy may help. The aim of this communication is to analyze the situation of the collaboration between one of the best reference centers in MS of Spain, the Valld Hebro Hospital in Barcelona, a very active patients association (FEM) and some fitness centers of the city of Barcelona. The project, developed during 6 months, has been based on semi-structured in-depth interviews with patients affected with different levels of disability and with physicians, nurses, physiotherapists, psychologists, speech therapist, occupational therapist, social workers and physical education specialists. The qualitative approach adopted allowed to discuss the need of improving the coordination between the health care providers participating on taking care of these patients and the resources of the community. At this point, we emphasize the need of empowering the role and knowledge of the professionals working at the fitness centers to help the patients suffering of this illness.

Keynote Forum

Mélanie Levasseur

Université de Sherbrooke, Canada

Keynote: Social participation in Canada: Desire to participate and restrictions

Time : 09:35-10:10

OMICS International Euro Health Care 2015 International Conference Keynote Speaker Mélanie Levasseur photo
Biography:

Mélanie Levasseur completed her Bachelor’s degree in Occupational Therapy at McGill University, a Master and Doctorate in Clinical research at the Université de Sherbrooke and a Postdoctoral fellowship in health promotion at the Institute of Public Health Research, Université de Montréal. Her research focuses on the social integration and participation of older people living at home, and interventions to promote health, including awareness of safe driving. She is a Fonds de la recherche en santé du Québec (FRQ-S) Junior 1 Researcher (#26815). She has published more than 45 papers in reputed journals and has been guest speaker in up to 45 events.

Abstract:

Defined as involvement of the person in activities that provide interactions with others in the community, social participation is a major determinant of health in older adults that requires innovative interventions. Among such interventions, the creations of favorable environments based on older adult’s preferences are increasingly promising. However, little is known aboutdesire to participate and restrictions in older adults. This study aimed to describe and compare desire to participate and reasons for restrictions in social participation among older Canadians. Secondary analysis of aggregated data from the cross-sectional 2008-2009 Canadian Community Health Survey involved 30,865 Canadians aged 45 and over. Quebecers participated least, while residents of the Prairies were the most involved in community activities (11.9 and 13.8). More Canadians aged 45-64 wanted to participate more in community activities than those aged 65 and over (36.8% vs. 23.9%), and women more than men (34.3% vs. 30.9%). However, environmental barriers, such as respondents not wanting to go alone, cost and transportation problems, restricted women more than men in both age groups. For women aged 65 and over, location inaccessibility (1.7% vs. 0.7%) and the unavailability of activities (8.0% vs. 5.4%) restricted their participation. The unavailability of activities was a barrier for 10% of women in the Atlantic region and Prairies, and also restricted older Canadians who lived in non-census metropolitan areas (non-CMAs) more than in CMAs (8.0% vs. 4.8%). Further research examining older Canadians’ locations in greater details and their social participation is needed to foster the creation of favorable environments.

OMICS International Euro Health Care 2015 International Conference Keynote Speaker Santiago Hors-Fraile photo
Biography:

Santiago Hors-Fraile is the CEO of Salumedia, a firm making digital healthcare strategies. He received his MSc in Computer Science at the University of Seville (Spain) and MSc in Software Engineering at Cranfield University (UK). He studied Healthcare Digital Marketing at the ESIC-ICEMD in Madrid (Spain). He is an expert in gamification and part of the engagement alliance. He has international experience in research and development of serious games for healthcare. He has published several scientific publications about exer games and run workshops about gamification applied to the healthcare sector.

Abstract:

One of the biggest problems in the healthcare sector is the lack of user engagement in healthcare programs. These programs should help users to change their habits towards a healthier lifestyle but, unfortunately, they are not attractive enough on their own. The main reason for this lack of usage is that people rarely fully engage with the program because they are boring. For example in rehabilitation programs, treatments for chronic diseases, disease awareness platforms and learning tools for healthcare professionals we need to have an extra motivation to standout in the life of the user and become an everyday part of their lives. Usually, this extra motivation has been tried to achieve with gamification. However, there is a boom of emerging apps, devices and systems to monitor one’s health and most of them use ‘pointification’, which is a poor implementation of gamification and may lead to misunderstanding its effectiveness. In order to design a successful and engaging healthcare program, we have to consider multiple factors that will affect how users experience the system. In this presentation, we will go deeper in the needs of a well-designed gamified system, explaining the different types of users, the ways we have to motivate them and the different stages of mastery they should follow in the long term within any gamified healthcare program.

Keynote Forum

Susan Halimeh

Gerinnungs zentrum Rhein-Ruhr and Coagulation Research Centre, Germany

Keynote: Menorrhagia and postpartum hemorrhage in women with rare bleeding disorder

Time : 10:45-11:20

OMICS International Euro Health Care 2015 International Conference Keynote Speaker Susan Halimeh photo
Biography:

Susan Halimeh has completed her medical education in 1997 at the School of Medicine in Hannover. She is the Medical Director of the Gerinnungszentrum Rhein-Ruhr and the Coagulation Research Centre GmbH in Duisburg, Germany. She has published diverse articles such as Menorrhagia and Postpartum Haemorrhage (PPH) in Women with Rare Bleeding Disorder, Thrombosis Research, 2015 Feb, Volume 135, Suppl. 1, S34-S37

Abstract:

In women, von Wille brand disease (VWD) is the most common inherited bleeding disorder. Objectively, it is defined as bleeding that lasts for more than seven days or results in the loss of more than 80 ml of blood per menstrual cycle. The prevalence of menorrhagia in a woman with a bleeding disorder ranges from 32 to 100%. Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) remains one of the leading causes of maternal morbidity and mortality worldwide. A treatment algorithm for severe persistent PPH was subsequently developed. These include mechanical or surgical maneuvers, i.e., intrauterine balloon tamponade or haemostatic brace sutures with hysterectomy as the final surgical option for uncontrollable PPH. Pharmacologic options include hemostatic agents (tranexamic acid), with timely transfusion of blood and plasma products playing an important role in persistent and severe PPH.