Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 8th World Congress on Healthcare and Medical Tourism Dubai UAE.

Day 1 :

Conference Series Health Congress 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Dan Levitt photo
Biography:

Dan Levitt shepherds the enhancement of social, spiritual and care needs for more than 300 seniors, inspiring a team of over 400 employees and volunteers with a commitment to continuously improving quality of life.  Dan is an Adjunct Professor in Gerontology teaching Long Term Care Administration at Simon Fraser University.  His adventure exploits have taken him from Africa’s highest peak Mt. Kilimanjaro to the Caribbean Sea’s Planacar Reef, from canoeing across the Yukon to racing in the Boston and New York Marathons.  Dan has appeared on television and radio as well as authoring  many articles in newspapers and professional journals.  His insights on seniors care leadership are sought after at events across Canada, the United States, Europe, Asia, Australia and New Zealand.

Abstract:

An integrated health care system across the continuum of care enables multiple technology platforms and software applications to be connected, communicate, and exchange data.  Information exchanged includes orders, therapy documentation, pre-move in data, and census information as well as continuity of care documents using clinical document architecture specifications.  An enabling health integration solution brings together a network of healthcare providers and partners to ensure the right information at the right time to make the best care giving decisions for seniors. Implementing innovative delivery systems improves quality, safety, lower costs and enhances health outcomes.  The investments focus on improving care delivery systems such as medication management: multi-dose pouch packaging, bar code scanning at point-of-care, optical verification technology, dose level inventory management, and verification of medication pass completion.  The person-centric care system is supported by a team of professionals, physicians, nurses, frail elders and their families to manage complex medication therapies.  With the growing complexity of seniors care, a highly specialized clinical management services manages risks and improves outcomes.

Keynote Forum

Cosimo Carfagna

Institute for Polymers, Composites and Biomaterials (IPCB CNR) Italy

Keynote: Polymer Science and Phytotherapy: Natural Remedy For Malaria and Cancer based on Electrospun Nanofibers containing Artemisinin

Time : 10:15

Conference Series Health Congress 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Cosimo Carfagna photo
Biography:

Prof. Cosimo Carfagna is full Professor of Chemistry at the University of Naples “Federico II”. Since 2001 he is Director of the Institute of Polymers, Composites and Biomaterials of C.N.R. From 2008 to 2010 he has been President of Research Area NA3 of C.N.R. He is member of the International Society of Liquid Crystals, member of the Material Research Society, member of the Academy of Science of New York, member of the Italian Society of Liquid Crystals, member of the Italian Society of Macromolecules, member of Italian Chemical Society, member of the Editorial Board of the review: Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials ISSN 0003-5599, member of the Scientific Committee of POLYCHAR, member of the evaluation board of Marie Curie Project , member of the University Committee in the University of Study of Basilicata, member of the Department Council in the Department of Engineering of the Materials and the Production of the University of Napoli, coordinator of the sponsored Project of CNR: Special Materials for Advanced Technologies, responsible for the research projects BRITE-EURAM, responsible for the research projects of CNR, coordinator of didactic activity of AIM, coordinator pro-tempore of Ph.D. in Engineering of Materials, referee of Ministry of Education of Portugal for evaluation of projects in the field of materials science, referee of Ministry of Education and Ministry of Industry of Italian Government for evaluation of research project on polymer technology. 

Abstract:

The continuous search of new therapy is requested by a growing resistance to major antimalarials. The sesquiterpene endoperoxide Artemisinin (ART) is currently one of the most effective natural treatment against multidrug resistant Plasmodium species, and ART combination treatments (ACTs) can represent an useful approach to fight resistance, as recommended by the WHO. ART relevance is witnessed by the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine awarded for one half by Professor Youyou Tu. Since seventies, Youyou Tu and her team focused their efforts to the development of new malarial therapies inspired by the traditional Chinese medicine; they discovered that Artemisinin appeared in several ancient recipes to treat the malarial disease. The mechanism of action of ART is ascribed to the presence of an endoperoxide group inside its molecule. On reacting with iron, the endoperoxide group breaks up, producing free radicals. When formed inside a malaria parasite, the radicals can lead to cellular damage and cell death. In a similar way, it has been found that ART is able to affect cancer cells due to their elevated iron concentration; derivatives of ART have shown promising anticancer effects against multiple cell lines derived from various types of cancers. Besides some evidence of the anticancer potential of ART, the exact mechanism of action of this drug in cancer still remains unclear. 

Conference Series Health Congress 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Lara Thomas photo
Biography:

Lara Thomas is the Executive Director of The MILLA Project. For over nine years her work has focused on health care, gender-based violence and health care education with an emphasis on assisting Middle Eastern and North African domestic and international communities. Ms. Thomas collaborates with Middle Eastern and North African non-profit and government agencies. In addition, under Lara’s directive, The MILLA Project received Special consultative status with the Economic and Social Council to the United Nations. Lara is also a certified law enforcer instructor – Instructor number 3692. Finally, Lara specializes in advancing cultural competency with macro and micro perspectives.

Abstract:

Gender based violence (GBV) is one of the most prevalent violations of human rights in the world (UNFPA, 2016). While statistical data denoting global prevalence is lacking due to non-uniformity and inconsistency in reporting standards, experts estimate 1 in 3 women worldwide have experienced physical or sexual violence (WHO, 2016). An annotated definition of GBV is, “physical, sexual or physical harm and/or suffering to women, including threats.” (UN, 1993). The power of one’s conceptual framework includes individual contributions that forward the advancement of sustainability in the global reduction and elimination of GBV. Building and implementing conceptual framework requires culturally relevant approaches. Cultural and contextual responsiveness incorporates perspectives, values and interests of people within contextual and geographical boundaries. Utilizing specific influences could promote the adaptation and implementation of sustainable solutions to the reduction and elimination of GBV. The power of one’s framework requires the expansion of private and public agencies to allow individual contributions while understanding the true impact that one person has.

Keynote Forum

Sandra Skerratt

York University, Canada

Keynote: Chronic Disease Management: The Role of The Global Nurse

Time : 11:15

Conference Series Health Congress 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Sandra Skerratt photo
Biography:

Abstract:

The expansion of primary health care strategies utilizing nurses is required to face the epidemic of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). NCDs, also known as chronic diseases, are of immense and growing importance worldwide. The human, social and economic consequences associated with the four major types of NCDs – cardiovascular diseases, cancers, chronic respiratory diseases and diabetes - are felt by all countries but are particularly devastating in poor and vulnerable populations. As the leading cause of death globally, NCDs were responsible for 38 million (68%) of the world’s 56 million deaths in 2012. More than 40% of them (16million) were premature deaths under age 70 years. Almost three quarters of all NCD deaths (28 million), and the majority of premature deaths (82%), occur in LMIC. These countries also need to deal with a dual burden of disease by addressing increasing amounts of NCDs simultaneously with having to address substantial burdens of communicable diseases. One large challenge for primary health care expansion in LMIC is the limited numbers of doctors. Only 5 of the 49 countries categorized as low-income economies meet the minimum threshold of 23 doctors per 10 000 population. In most countries, nurses account for more than 50% of health-care providers, representing the largest group who can make significant contributions to prevent and treat NCDs. Increasing reference to nurse-led chronic disease management clinics is present within the literature. In high income countries, it has been demonstrated that nurse led clinics provided care that was acceptable, feasible, sustainable and with significant improvements in benchmark goals for hypertension and diabetes at 6 months and 1 year. CHRONIC DISEASE MANAGEMENT: THE ROLE OF THE GLOBAL NURSE 2 The purpose of this presentation is threefold: to describe the NCD epidemic faced by LMIC; the importance of building a sustainable global nurse workforce to tackle this challenge; and the applicability of using a Canadian chronic disease management model which effectively utilizes the role of specialized nurses in optimizing chronic disease management among adults in primary health care.

  • Healthcare and Medical Tourism

Chair

Malek El Husseini

Qatar First Bank, Qatar

Session Introduction

Malek El Husseini

Qatar First Bank, Qatar

Title: GLOBAL TRENDS DRIVING HEALTHCARE TOURISM
Biography:

Malek El Husseini serve as Healthcare Operating partner, Alternative investments at Qatar first Bank, a healthcare platform who invest into healthcare industry across the MENA region. He was the General Manager, Diagnostic Cardiology for GE Healthcare, Middle East, Africa, Turkey & CA, Russia & CIS since September 2012. Malek initially began working with GE Healthcare as the Manager for Performance Solutions (the consulting arm of GE Healthcare) in the Middle East, Africa, Turkey & Central Asia in 2006.   In 2009 Malek was appointed the Business Development Director for the Middle East and handled the healthcare investments portfolio for GE Healthcare in the Middle East. Malek brings more than twenty two years of industry experience, with over twelve years directly related to consulting in healthcare. Prior to joining GE Healthcare, Malek spent seven years as the Director for ECRI Institute a collaborating center for the World Health Organization in the Middle East. While working for ECRI Institute, Malek interacted with most of major hospitals in the Middle East.  Malek started his career in the United Arab Emirates working as Chief Biomedical Engineer for Tawam Hospital in 1994. Before that he worked as Biomedical Engineer at Montreal Heart Institute in Canada for three years. Malek is a lead reviewer for the Central Board for Accreditation of Healthcare Institutions in Saudi Arabia. Malek was appointed as an external advisor for IFC/Worldbank  for medical devices manufacturing investment committee.

Abstract:

The pace of change in health care operations needs is accelerating we see changes in clinical practices, policies, and processes, the pressure on public to reduce cost and private to get more involved in order to satisfy patient needs using existing care settings, operating funds, and workforce. I will discuss the major drivers favoring healthcare tourism, the role of the government into setting up the strategy and the role of private investment to foster such changes, I will also take as example, Dubai, Jordan, Turkey and Thailand as examples. The role of innovation/technology to speed such the process and how countries can benefit from experience of each other.

Biography:

Markus Giebel is the CEO and co-owner of Eternity, previously the CEO of Deyaar, a publically traded company, and Vice President of Corning, a Fortune 500 technology company in the US. He serves on several company boards and has more than 25 patents registered in his name. Working from Dubai, Markus Giebel recognised early that predictive and preventive healthcare, or age management, is fast developing into a multi-billion Dollar global market. His vision was, with the correct screening and intervention, people need no longer wait to get sick before late-stage diseases were treated and cured. Within the next ten years, he said, annual health screening would be as commonplace as regular inspections are for your car today. The current sick-care system would evolve into a genuine health-care system. At every regular car inspection nowadays, your car is plugged into an analytical computer system that provides vital data. Predictive and preventive healthcare works on the same principle and, in future, sophisticated computer systems will support your physician in his diagnosis and decision-making processes.

Abstract:

The developed world is slowly beginning to shift from traditional models of sick care to new systems, where genuine healthcare plays a more important role. This shift will involve changes across the board in the way that both patients and physicians approach medical care. Eternity is now the largest health screening company in the Middle East and has developed its own Software for Age Management, or SAM. This unique software addresses both the client experience and the physician experience within a cloud-based environment; any physician can use SAM without complex training. This new approach to predictive and preventive healthcare allows each client to view a fully visualized report of his or her health, and measure themselves against benchmarks, much like the P&L statement of a company. A client health app that works on any smartphone delivers medical reports, medical product recommendations, fitness and nutritional advice, and much more, on one single platform.

Kinda Khalaf

Khalifa University of Science, Technology and Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, UAE

Title: THE PAST AND PRESENT OF HUMAN MOVEMENT RESEARCH: TOWARDS THE DESIGN OF HUMAN-LIKE ROBOTS
Biography:

Kinda Khalaf received her B.S. (Summa Cum Laude with Distinction) and M.S. (Honors) degrees from the Ohio State University, USA. Her Ph.D., also from OSU, is in Biomechanics/ Computational Biomechanics, specializing in Biomaterials, and Dynamic modeling and control. Dr. Khalaf has held faculty appointments in Engineering and Medicine at several prestigious universities including the University of Miami and the American University of Beirut, and currently serves as associate chair of the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Khalifa University in Abu Dhabi. She has numerous publications in the areas of Orthopedic Biomechanics, Computational Biomechanics, biomaterials, and neuromusculoskeletal modeling and control Dr. Khalaf is on the list of International Who Is Who of Professionals. She has been awarded various awards and honors including the prestigious National Merit Scholar. She is currently the chairperson of the UAE branch of IEEE, EMBS, in addition to her membership is several professional organizations.

Abstract:

 

Two issues are presented in this paper: (i) A perspective on the development of computationally-based representation, modeling, control, and animation of human movement; and (ii) the role played by rigid body dynamics. The central nervous system (CNS) in humans is the most advanced and amazing natural system in existence. One needs all the tools: experimental, psycho-physical, developmental, neuroscience-based, and physiological methodologies, in addition to the computational method, if there is to be any hope of understanding such a system thoroughly. With respect to the computational method, study of movement is simpler than the study of other brain attributes: vision, speech, memory, learning, hearing, etc. Movement is distributed and spread over the body. It is more easily accessible to detailed observation. It is also subject to easier invasive and noninvasive measurement. Computational studies of human movement should facilitate the understanding of the spinal cord, and possibly the design of artifcial spinal cords for robots, humanoids and the injured. The spinal cord, in turn, being a rich two way access to the brain for distributed control, signal processing and signal transmission, should help in better understanding of brain function. One is led to computational models that are systematic and imitate natural human motion at di®erent levels of complexity and physiological accuracy. The models should allow for the insertion of ligaments, cartilage, muscles, and soft tissues. Particular representations of rigid body dynamics are needed for modeling the skeleton and joints with different degrees of freedom. Rigid body dynamics are also required for implementing contact and connection with the environment, or objects in the environment, as well as other attributes of human movement in work, dance, competition, locomotion, etc. Needless to say, the models are expected to support and complement experimental and other studies that deal with human posture and movement.

Biography:

Andrew D. Scarffe is a graduate of the Faculty of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences and works as a Research Associate with the Ivey International Centre for Health Innovation at the Ivey Business School. His personal research focuses on international activities of Academic Health Science Centres, as well as the intersection of global health initiatives and national security. Andrew has a forth coming book capter, The future of mHealth in the on-demand economy, in the book The Digitalization of Healthcare. Other research endeavours as lead him to be an invited keynote lecturer in Beijing, China on the intersection of healthcare and education.

Abstract:

 

This study explored the nature of international agreements (IAs) within Ontario Academic Health Science Centres (OAHSC) and presents the exploratory findings to create a basis for an academically defensible body of literature on the topic. In light of increasing healthcare costs, the Ontario health system needs to employ mechanisms that decrease expenditures, as well as strategies that have the potential to generate ancillary revenue. However, given the public nature of the provincial health system, these mechanisms and strategies should not be solely evaluated with respect to financial return on investments, but also evaluated with respect to the value that is delivered to the population. Further, as OAHSCs continue to broaden their market to emerging and developing economies, it is increasingly important to identify how, and if, these agreements contribute valuably to their respective OAHSC and provincial health system.

 

For the purposes of this study, IAs were defined as “hospital agreements with foreign governments or organizations for the provision of health-care related consulting and other services” (; these agreements exclude conditions for international patient services [IPS] (i.e., solicitation of international patients). The results from this study explore the unique drivers, barriers and provincial/ organizational benefits of pursuing IAs amongst OAHSC. In publically funded health systems, it is important to understand the different elements of IAs and be able to identify the return on investment and/or impact that these agreements are having on the systems’ ability to provide high quality care to local patients; this is only possible after close consideration of the drivers, barriers and benefits of IAs.

Biography:

Dr M Abd El Bagi is a consultant radiologist at the National Guard Hospital of King Abdulaziz Medical City in Riyadh. He is a Fellow of the Royal College of Radiologists(London) and a Fellow of the Faculty of Radiologists at the Royal College of Surgeons(Ireland). He obtained a Master degree on Total Quality Management from Ribat University and was previously a Professor of radiology at the National University in Khartoum.

Abstract:

This study aims to find out whether health care high reliability (HCHR) key principles are adhered to by the front line staff. The proceedings of the radiology total quality management committee were reviewed at an 800 bed tertiary care centre. The results showed that sensitivity to operations principle of HCHR was applied long ago. This was manifest as displayed statistics and graphs of total activity times for all imaging sub-sections. The reluctance to simplify was exemplified by a fish hook root cause analysis to diagnose causes of MRI scans cancellations. Occupation with failure was noted in the continuous monitoring of radiologists pre-procedure protocolling such that the scan is performed by the technologist in the right way. A Swiss cheese risk management module was used to plan check points. Deference to expertise was manifested by involving an immunologist and a nephrologist in the revision the contrast media administration. As for resilience, staff were constantly trained how to deal with contrast media reactions and basic life support. Discrepancies were transparently discussed on weekly meetings. Communication of urgent clinical findings is secured through semi-automated phone text and e-mail notification of the referring physician which is monitored for loop closure when relevant action was taken. As for safety culture, a bi-annual cycle of right care right now is running for infection control. In conclusion we found that the practice at this department is in line with the highest level of HCHR transformation journey. It has surpassed infancy and teething problems into maturity.

Biography:

Graduated from the American University of Beirut Lebanon in 1981and pursued residency in internal medicine and fellowship in infectious diseases at Wayne State University affiliated hospitals USA.He is certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine as well as Infectious Diseases. He is a fellow of the American College of Physicians an member of the Infectious Diseases Society of America .Post graduation he joined King Fahd University in Saudi Arabia as assistant professor of medicine and infectious diseases. After that he joined Hamad Medical Center in Qatar for 4 years before returning to clinical practice in Western Pennsylvania. He served as infection control program director at Uniontown hospital. He joined Zayed Military Hospital Abu Dhabi in December 1996 as consultant internal medicine and infectious diseases. Currently he is consultant and head infectious diseases section at ZMH.

Abstract:

Background: Candida species(C. Species) are increasigly isolated  from blood cultures (1) being the fourth most common blood culture isolate in recent years.

Material/methods: Retrospective review of the microbiology laboratoryrecords, for the period from 1st January 2010 till end of December 2014was carried out.

Results: Ninety three episodes were identified. C. parapsilosis was the most common isolate (30) followed by tropicalis (29) then  albicans (16 ), and glabrata (12)

C. albicans, C. tropicalis and C. glabrata were sensitive to Fluconazole in100%, 100% and 91.6%, respectively.

C. parapsilosis was sensitive to fluconazole in only 21.4%(6 isolates) and intermediate in (78.6%) 22 isolates.

Central venous access was the documented source of candidemia in 39.7% (37 episodes).

C parapsilosis accounted for (16) of them followed by albicans (10 ),  tropicalis  (9) and kruseii (2)

Candidemia trends changed during 2014 as new species never isolated before emerged, such as Krusei( 2), Guilliermondii (1), Lusitanii (1) and others( 2).

Conclusions: Non albicans candida has outnumbered albicans as blood stream isolates in the past 5 yearswith candida parapsillosis being the most prevalent isolate. In view of the unusual sensitivity pattern of C.parapsillosis and the emergence of new C.species prospective studies are required to evaluate candidemia riskfactors, especially central lines use and antifungal treatment patterns in order to formulate appropriate preventive and therapeutic recommendations.

Biography:

Prof. Akinsola is a public health specialist. He obtained his first degree and Ph.D. at the University of Ibadan, Nigeria; and Master’s degree at the University of Manchester, England..  Between 2009 and 2015, Prof. Akinsola was the Head of the Dept. of Public Health at the University of Venda where he has been working since 2007. He retired in May 2015 and he is currently a Professor Emeritus in Public Health at the University of Venda.

Abstract:

The purpose of the study was to assess the self-perceived impact of work life on nurses caring for people living with HIV/AIDS in a municipality in South Africa. The study adopted a cross-sectional design and the target population was the nurses caring for people living with HIV/AIDS at the hospitals in Thulamela municipality, South Africa. A sample of 200 nurses was taken randomly from the 4 hospitals and wards where HIV/AIDS patients are admitted in the municipality. A Likert Scale type of questionnaire was used as the instrument for data collection. The questionnaire was self-administered. The Statistical Package for Social Sciences software (SPSS) version 20.0 was used for data analysis. Ethical clearance certificate to conduct this study was issued by the University of Venda Research Ethical Committee. The result showed that the general feeling of a sizeable proportion of the respondents was that they suffered from signs of psychological problems due to their caring role and they also expressed feelings of depression and burnout.

Biography:

Bita Anvari is working at Internal Medicine Department, Imam Khomeini Hospital, Kermanshah University of Medical Science, Iran.

 

Abstract:

Abstract Background:

Methotrexate (MTX) and anti-malarial drugs are widely prescribed for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) as disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs). Some patients discontinue treatment because of their adverse effects which could induce disease reactivation.

 

Aim of the work:

We aimed to evaluate common causes of DMARD discontinuation such as MTX, chloroquine (CQ) and hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

 

Patients and methods:

We reviewed the records of RA patients referred to the rheumatologic clinic of Shariati Hospital in 2006 and their records were retrospectively reviewed till 1991. Patients who received MTX (with or without CQ or HCQ consumption) for at least one month were included to determine the frequency and more prevalent causes of drug discontinuation.

 

Results:

Among 295 RA patients, 28.5% discontinued MTX. Adverse drug effects were found in 27.4% of the patients. However, no serious adverse events such as cirrhosis were reported. Among 271 patients who received antimalarial agents, 41.3% discontinued treatment. 51.3% of drug withdrawals were because of ophthalmological consultation and presence of retinopathy, macular pigmentation, and keratopathy, without any persistent or serious ocular complication such as blindness. Only patients who discontinued treatment due to retinopathy were significantly older than the others.

 

Conclusion:

With respect to the relatively low rate of discontinuation due to adverse effects, MTX seems to be a safe drug for long-term use in RA patients. Serial eye examination for those using antimalarial drug will protect them against ocular toxicity which could further lead to higher rates of drug discontinuation.

Biography:

Viresh Chopra has completed his MDS in Conservative Dentistry & Endodontics at the age of 26 years from Subharti Dental College in INDIA. He is the Founder member of Indian academy of Conservative Dentists and Endodontists in Delhi. He has published more than 15 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an international editorial board member of International Journal of Oral Research. He i salso a Co Author  of two bokks on Halitosis and Regenration in Endodontics. He has researched thesis on Composites which has been published in Reputed journal.During his internship he was nominated for Pierre Fauchard Academy Award for Best intern in his college. He has also been selected and invited to Zurich to attend teach the Trainers programme in Advance Endodontics and Aesthetic Dentistry by Coltene, Whaldent. He is a Key opinion Leader for Coltene, Whaldent in Oman. Currently, He is working as Faculty of Endodontology in Oman Dental College, MUscat, Oman.

Abstract:

Dental caries has been recognized as an infectious disease; hence it becomes important for everyone to understand the underlying causes of dental caries and intervene at the right time to prevent this disease. As in earlier times, Restoration of a carious lesion is no longer considered as a cure. Perhaps the mostvaluable return on diligent preventive care is avoiding simple tooth decay from grwoing into a worse problem. Left untreated, it can either extend into a gum diseae, painful conditions or tooth extraction which can inturn lead to other dental problems.As clinicians it is our duty to recognize patients with active caries or signs of this disease and provide appropriate preventive and treatment measures. Progress of a carious lesion leads to more painful conditions which require more intensive treatment like Root canal Treament. Dental Caries preventive methods include sealent application, antimicrobial agents and many more. Caries control  methods are more invasive and include cutting of tooth structure for restoring the decayed part of the tooth, It also  includes pulpal therapy and restoration of badly broken teeth in cases where caries progression has not been controlled. With time changes and advancements have taken place in terms of Demtal Materials, Concepts and technologies. Knowledge of these advancements not only help the clinicians in curing the disease but also helps us to recognize patients at high rish and prevent the disease in them. It is the duty of the academic teams of various institutions around the world to develop quality diagnostic tools and better preventive and control measures so as to control and prevent this infetious disease.

Eugenia Radkova

OCT Clinical Trials, Saint Petersburg, Russia

Title: MEDICAL WRITING IN RUSSIA: MORE THAN MEDICAL, MORE THAN WRITING
Biography:

Eugenia Radkova graduated with honors from the Mechnikov St. Petersburg State Medical Academy and is a holder of a scholarship from the Russian Government. She holds a PhD in Medicine and has a strong educational and research experience in pharmacology and preventive medicine. While working in the academic sphere she has published more than 50 scientific articles and was a co-author and co-investigator in research projects under the Russian Federal Targeted Programme. Research experience and knowledge gained in medicine and pharmacology allow her to successfully address the issues in the field of drug development and clinical trials.

Abstract:

The number of clinical trials has been actively growing in Russia since 2010 when the federal law on drug circulation was first published. For drug registration in Russia, the local registrational clinical trials (for products already marketed in other countries) as well as full program of phase I-III clinical trials (for innovative drugs) have become essential. This resulted in fast development of medical writing industry, since there was a growing demand for regulatory and trial-related documents. Specific conditions in which local pharmaceutical companies operate, such as little experience in planning and conducting of clinical trials, no possibility to liaise and get scientific advice from regulatory authorities, the deficiency of highly-qualified personnel in biostatistics, study design and methodology, have defined the special role of medical writers in Russia. In addition to basic professional skills, the medical writer should be ready to provide scientific advice on drug registration strategy and consult on all aspects of study design and methodology. The medical writer could also be involved in the statistical planning of the study, as well as final data statistical review and interpretation. This “Russian medical writer’s mission” has its own pros and cons. The medical writers have the opportunity to develop wide range of professional skills, get deeper understanding of clinical trial “physiology” and obtain experience in both medical writing and medical advising in different therapeutic areas. On the other hand, the need for continuous self-education and the ability to daily work with huge amount of scientific information become critical for success.

Biography:

Rajko Oostojić has graduated from School of Medicine in Zagreb as Medical Doctor, with the specialties including gastroenterology. Presently, Ostojić is working at the School of Medicine, University of Zagreb as a full time professor, and in the University Hospital Center Zagreb as the head of the Internal Medicine Clinic. Besides his outstanding academic contribution and professional engagement in healthcare sector, Ostojić also served as the Minister of Health of the Republic of Croatia in the period 2012-2014.

Abstract:

In a current environment depicted by the process of globalization, technology development and knowledge society, a necessary condition for economic development is closer cooperation between academia, industry and the public sector in establishing a mechanism for joint action to achieve development goals. Moreover, strategies based on the triple helix perspective recognize and stress the importance of harmonization and cooperation between all stakeholders, as well as the importance of creating an enabling business environment and creating innovation. Health tourism represents a niche with a significant development potential. The aim of the paper is to present and analyze incentive measures for health tourism development on the example of the Republic of Croatia. The analysis has shown that it is necessary to provide scientific and research basis for successful governance of future development policies and to introduce quality programs and improved management in the overall system of healthcare and tourism supply. Several initiatives by the Ministry of Economy have been launched to encourage research, development and innovation and to build centers of exellence in the field of health tourism that should contribute to the strengthening the innovation capacity of the business sector; development and promotion of new information-communication technology solutions in health tourism, thus strengthening the competitiveness and export growth of the Croatian economy; and to linking academic, public and business sectors through the existing infrastructure in order to create the innovation value chain.