Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 12th World Congress on Industrial Health, Healthcare and Medical Tourism Dubai, UAE.

Day 2 :

Keynote Forum

Yassen Alfoteih

Canadian University Dubai, UAE

Keynote: Shisha: The silent killer
OMICS International Health Congress 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Yassen Alfoteih photo
Biography:

Y Alfoteih has obtained his PhD in Environmental Biology from the University of Hohenheim, Germany and did his Post-Doctoral Research in Epidemiology at Newcastle University, Institute of Cellular and Medical Sciences. He has worked across many universities in Syria and UAE as an Assistant Professor and has also worked as a Consultant in industry. He has published in many international journals and has presented and chaired sessions at national and international conferences. He is presently serving as the Chair of the School of Public Health and Health Sciences at Canadian University Dubai, UAE.

 

Abstract:

Smoking tobacco is known to increase morbidity and mortality worldwide. Water pipe tobacco smoking is becoming a remarkable phenomenon in the GCC countries. Moreover, this habit shows a continual proliferation pattern related to the fact that the number of smokers and the number of shisha places are increased sharply. While teens have become more addicted to shisha due their new lifestyle, some adult use shisha during their business meetings and negotiations. The clinical data has apparently addressed the drastic impact of smoking on human health, while the impact of pathogens of shisha (itself) is not properly studied. This study aims at examining the risk of bacterial and fungal transmission through frequent or/and repeated usage of same water pipe by different smokers in public cafes. Furthermore, this study will recommend the best practices to eliminate pathogenic infection. 110 samples were collected from different cafes in Dubai and Ajman cities in the time period between Nov. 2016 and Feb. 2017. Bacterial and fungal strains were examined using standard protocol of culturing, isolating and identifying microorganism. In addition, the resistance of isolated bacteria to common antibiotics was determined by the mean of antibiotic susceptibility test of each isolate. Six bacterial strains have been detected which are Pseudomonas putida, Staphylococcus saprophyticus, Pantoea agglomerans, Bacillus cereus and Providencia alcalifaciens. One of the most important finding of the current study is the isolated bacteria Staphylococcus saprophyticus which showed methicillin resistance. This makes the current study of clinical importance for health promotion and awareness.

Keynote Forum

Seow Ta Wee

Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia, Malaysia

Keynote: Safety and health issues of solid waste management in developing countries
OMICS International Health Congress 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Seow Ta Wee photo
Biography:

Seow Ta Wee has his expertise in environmental management, he has 16 years teaching, research and consultation experience. He has completed his PhD in Environmental Management from Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM). His research interest is in field of environmental management, solid waste management, safety and health management, community Development, regional transformation development, urban and rural development & environment, housing, social science, construction sociology and construction waste management. He supervise more than 30 post graduate students included post-doctoral. 

Abstract:

All activities in solid waste management involve risk, either to the worker directly involved, or to the nearby resident. Risks occur at every step in the process, from the point where residents handle wastes in the home for collection or recycling, to the point of ultimate disposal. This paper discusses both occupational health risks to workers and environmental health risks to residents and workers. In developing countries, workers and waste pickers handling solid waste throughout the world are exposed to occupational health and accident risks related to the content of the materials they are handling, emissions from those materials, and the equipment being used. People living and working in the vicinity of solid waste processing and disposal facilities also are exposed to environmental health and accident risks. These risks relate to the emissions from the solid wastes, the pollution control measures used to manage these emissions, and the overall safety of the facility. As with occupational risks, these risks are being substantially managed in high-income countries, but are still largely unmanaged in most developing countries. In developing countries, the health-related underpinnings of solid waste management still need to be addressed. In developing countries, while the per capita quantities of wastes and labor costs are low, the costs of providing solid waste management (even at their current lower standard of operation) are not proportionately low. Equipment capital costs and fuel costs in low-income countries are comparable to those in high-income countries, and sometimes are higher because of importation costs and currency exchange variations. To overcome safety and health issues of solid waste management in developing countries, governance needed to have efficient planning for short term, long term and special program for waste picker toward sustainable development in solid waste management at national level.

  • Mental and Physical Health | Healthcare Management | Occupational Toxicology | Genetic and Cellular Toxicology
Speaker
Biography:

Mallika Rajadurai has started her nursing career from College of Nursing, CMC&H, Vellore, South India. She has served in Department of Health and Medical Services, Dubai for 13 years as a Clinical Nurse in the Primary Health Care. She has presented number of papers and authored book in nursing. She has experience of 45 years in nursing fraternity and has received the highest achievement award in recognition of her excellence and outstanding contribution to nursing research by the International Center for Collaborative Research, Chennai.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: India has 27 Million births per year; with its high maternal mortality of about 75000-50,000 maternal deaths occur every year in India. Reduction of maternal mortality is crucial. It is also a need for achieving the Millennium Development Goal 5(MDG 5). One way to tackle this problem is to have Skilled Birth Attendant at the time of delivery by training a cadre of people. This was an effort of National Rural Health Mission (NRHM). The knowledge on midwifery care is essential for nurses to practice safe maternal and newborn care. Therefore, the investigator designed this study in order to assess the knowledge on midwifery care among nurses in PHC in order to develop a teaching module for skilled birth.

Methodology: Survey approach and non-experimental descriptive design was used for this study. The participants of the study were 300 nurses working in 28 primary health centers of Thoothukudi Health Unit district, Tamil Nadu, India using convenient sampling. The nurses included were staff nurses, VHN and ANMs. The knowledge of nurses was assessed using a self-administered questionnaire with 50 multiple-choice questions.

Results: From 300 nurses, the majority of nurses have inadequate knowledge 296 (98.7%) and 4 (1.3%) nurses had moderately adequate knowledge in midwifery care.

Conclusion: The investigator had developed a teaching module as an outcome of the study on management of general obstetrics and newborn care including lifesaving obstetric care. This was validated by experts and will be utilized.

Speaker
Biography:

Iram Saddiqa Aamir is a physiologist, working and involved in Physiology teaching for undergraduate/postgraduate for the last 15 years. She is highly concerned about mental health of medical students especially stress and anxiety levels during academic sessions of MBBS and BDS students.

Abstract:

Statement of Problem: Stress is known to affect learning abilities and also be a risk factor for various health and psychological difficulties. Through earlier studies, stress levels of medical students have established to be high during their academic life. In Pakistan, local epidemiological data about psychological morbidity among medical undergraduate students is infrequent. An extensive electronic internet-based search failed to locate any study which shows a comparison of stress between medical students and the students of other professions in Karachi, which is the objective of our study.

Methodology: The study was conducted at various professional colleges all over Karachi. A sample of 600 students, 50 from each of the 12 selected colleges was taken. A standardized stress questionnaire of the International Stress Management Association (UK) was used to assess the stress levels which categorized the level of stress into mild, moderate and severe.

Findings: Stress levels were found to be higher in medical students, and this stress was mostly attributed to studies according to majority of the medical students (75.6%), where as calculated stress levels were also higher in medical students (54.6%).

Conclusion: Stress levels of medical students were found to be suggestively higher than those of non-medical professional students. Thus, medical students should be provided with appropriate counseling and stress relieving activities to prevent the long term antagonistic effects of elevated stress levels on the physical and mental health of future doctors.

Speaker
Biography:

Mohammad Fareed is currently working as an Assistant Professor in College of Medicine at Al Imam Mohammad ibn Saud Islamic University in Saudi Arabia. He has research experience in environmental health and occupational toxicology at Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, India, where he has completed his PhD. His research interest is life style and environmental risk factors in the pathogenesis of some metabolic diseases. He has published 16 papers in various journals of international repute and 17 abstracts.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: During agricultural work practices, spraying of pesticides without following any protective measures lead to various adverse health effects among farmers.

 

Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: A case control study was performed among 52 male pesticide sprayers working in mango orchards of Lucknow district in a northern state of India, compared with 30 control subjects. Pesticide sprayers were selected on the basis of clinical examination for acute and chronic health symptoms associated with pesticide exposure. Among those pesticide sprayers who reported these symptoms, investigation of oxidative stress parameters and genetic polymorphism of Paraoxonase 1 gene (PON1) for the assessment of intra individual susceptibility for organophosphate pesticides was performed. Cholinesterase level as biomarker of OP pesticides was investigated to ensure the exposure among pesticide sprayers.

 

Findings: Clinical examination of pesticide sprayers showed some acute and chronic symptoms for different organ systems. Activities of acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase were found to be significantly depleted (p<0.05) among pesticide sprayers as compared to controls. Activity of blood CAT was found to be higher but not found to be statistically significant; activity of blood GPx was found to be significantly higher (p<0.05); blood GSH was found to be significantly decreased (p<0.05); blood MDA level was found to be more in pesticide sprayers as compared to control subjects. A decrease in the percentage of high-activity genotypes at both L55M and Q192R was observed in the farm workers reporting symptoms of pesticide toxicity.

 

Conclusion & Significance: Our study shows that occupational exposure of OP pesticides lead to alterations in anti-oxidants enzymes, eventually leading to the oxidative stress condition. PON1 gene polymorphisms influence the susceptibility of OP pesticides, hence it may be considered a useful biomarker of genetic susceptibility for the assessment of inter individual risk of OP pesticide exposure.

Speaker
Biography:

Alakidi V is currently a Medicine student at Medical University Sofia, Medicine Faculty, Bulgaria. He is interested in and has some experience in the field of social medicine and health management and pathology training.

Abstract:

Salutogenesis is the counterpoint of the concept of risk factors in modern epidemiology and of the pathogenetic approach in medicine. The interest is focused on the triggering forces of sustainable health care, perceived as a health continuum/unity rather than a dichotomy variable. We analyze the model of salutogenesis, developed by the medical sociology professor Aaron Antonovsky, which is based on the multidimensional dependence of health focusing on two cores: The generalized resistance resources and the coherent spirituality in its tridimensional nature. Lasting for more than 30 years, despite some critics and relative vulnerability, the constructive and logical approach to this theory is the reason for continuing scientific interest and the further upgrade of the theory. The comparison between the pathogenetic and salutogenetic concepts in the context of modern interpretation is the starting point for a paradigm change in preventive medicine and health promotion. The salutogentic thesis reverses the basic questions of classic medicine: Why and what makes people sick? The major dilemmas here are: Why do some individuals remain healthy even when exposed to constellations of multiple risks and pathogens, psychosocial pressure and critical life events? The concept of slautogenesis is focused mainly on: (1) The individual being both healthy and ill at the same time, (2) Asking questions: (a) What produces health? (b) How do we sustain/preserve health? (c) What factors stimulate/provoke health? (d) What are the prerequisites for health improvement after a period of sickness? (e) How individuals get healthier and less ill? (f) What distinguishes individuals, who regardless of extreme burden do not get sick?

Speaker
Biography:

Raquel Alves dos Santos has her expertise in DNA damage and genomic instability related to occupational exposure, non-transmissible chronic diseases and cancer.

Abstract:

There are a great number of genetic biomarkers to evaluate the effects of a single or multiple compounds. While OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation Development) predicts genotoxicity assessment as part of toxicological evaluation of natural compounds, drugs, pesticides, nanomaterials, etc. Great progress has also been made to assess the effects of exposition in human populations at cellular and molecular levels. The search for the correct genetic biomarker results in the understanding of how exposure affects the genomic stability as well as how the genetic background modulates the cellular responses to exposure. This presentation will discuss the use of chromosomal aberration, micronuclei, comet assay, genetic polymorphisms and gene expression as part of in vitro genotoxicological evaluation of natural compounds (kaurenoic acid, hinokinin), pesticides (rotenone), biomaterials (poly-lactic acid, nanocellulose-collagen-apatite composite), nanomaterials (carbon nanotubes, PLGA) and metals (aluminum), as well as the use of these biomarkers to assess genomic instability in pesticide-exposed populations, breast cancer diagnosed women and type-2 diabetes patients. The presentation will also discuss how all this knowledge can be translated into practice via exposure/disease prevention and health promotion strategies based on early genome instability detection.

 

Jyoti Sarin

Maharishi Markandeshwar University, India

Title: Explore Nurses’ Opinion: Migration
Speaker
Biography:

Jyoti Sarin has completed her PhD in Nursing (2005) from Rajkumari Amrit Kaur College of Nursing, University of Delhi, India. She was awarded President of India Silver Medal for academic excellence in BSc Nursing and President of India Gold Medal for academic excellence in Master of Nursing Program. During her 20 years of teaching experience at RAKCON, she was associated with teaching of BSc Nursing, Post-certificate course in Nursing Education and Administration and Master in Nursing. She is an active Member of TNAI and National Neonatology Forum. She had been the Treasurer of TNAI, Delhi branch for a period of 8 years.

Abstract:

Background: As the demand for nurses rises worldwide, commercial recruiters have become increasingly interested in the potential for exporting nurses from India to developed countries. While India does have a large potential labor pool that could be trained as nurses, at present India does not have enough professional nurses to meet its own domestic health service’s needs.

Objectives: To assess the opinion of nurses regarding migration and to find out the association of opinion of nurses with their demographic variables.

Hypothesis: There will be significant association of opinion of nurses regarding migration with their demographic variables (H1).

Methodology: Quantitative approach, non-experimental descriptive exploratory study was conducted on opinion of nurses regarding migration with 80 nurses including student and professional nurses in Rajahmundry, Andhra Pradesh. India. Purposive sampling was used and the data was collected by structured migration opinionnaire (17 items including 6 domains) with paper pencil technique.

Results: Most of the nurses (75%) had strong intention to migrate as they were in the category of more likely to migrate followed by only 25% had less intention and in the category of less likely to migrate. The overall mean score of opinion among nurses was 57.69 with mean percentage of 68. Based on domains, nurses had higher opinion for migration in sense of profession as calculated mean percentage was 76 (Rank I) followed by finance (75%, Rank II); responsibility to country (69%, Rank III); desire to move (66%, Rank IV); safety (65%, Rank V) and stability (62%, Rank VI). There was no significant association of opinion score of nurses with their selected demographic variables such as age, gender, designation and professional experience as calculated F value and independent t test value were statistically non-significant at 0.05 level. It infers that opinion of nurses regarding migration is not dependent on their demographic characteristics.

Conclusion: Study finding concludes that most of the nurses had strong positive intention to get migrated and there was no any association of their opinion with selected variables.

Speaker
Biography:

Hoorieh Afkari has received her Master’s degree in 2013 and PhD degree in 2017 in Computer Science from School of Computing, University of Eastern Finland, Finland. Her research interests are human computer interaction with the focus on medical environment and medical technologies, eye-tracking technology and interaction design.

Abstract:

From the first moment in diagnosis process to the last step of treatment, medical technologies empower practitioners to conduct a successful process. Practitioners, as the main role in this process are the end users of these technologies. In decades, medical procedures benefit from advances in healthcare technologies; yet, beyond the technical aspects, these technologies take advantages from innovations in human-computer interaction research. Either an individual uses a medical device, or there is a combination of several devices and a complex teamwork, the smooth interaction of practitioners with these devices affects the quality of outcome. As new medical technologies are introduced into the operating rooms, these bring along issues concerning ergonomics and human-factors that affect team collaboration. The mechanisms of team collaboration need to be first understood. Same concept has been applied in micro-neurosurgery. Advances in the surgical microscopes bring more precision to the treatment and empower the surgeon to conduct a successful procedure. However, recent researches indeed reported that the use of the microscope imposes several constraints, both on the surgeon’s performance and on the collaborative processes during the intraoperative care. Because the interaction with the surgical microscope is hand-based through the control handgrips it has been observed previously that a source of interruption comes from the needs to adjust the device. On the other hand, the surgical procedure is not confined to the surgeon’s work. The complex teamwork of the OR team member and in particular, the scrub is an essential factor to achieve an error-free operation. It is important to know how the presence of the microscope and constant engagement of the surgeon with it, effects on the work of the nurse and other team members. We construct knowledge for improvement of the user interaction with the surgical microscope in neurosurgical operating rooms and we explored the potentials for replacing the current hands-based interaction with gaze interaction.

Speaker
Biography:

Alaa S Abou Khzam has completed his BS in Physical Therapy from the Lebanese University, Faculty of Public Health. His research interests include neurorehabilitation, healthcare research methodology, motor control and motor learning.

 

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Clinical trial registries (CTR) fail in comparison with major databases. However, the registration of trials promotes transparency and reduces risk of publication bias. Many previous studies have shown that searching CTR for systematic reviews (SRs) is not present on a consistent basis. No analysis exists evaluating the extent of employing a search strategy targeting CTR in open access SRs studying the effectiveness of physical therapy interventions on low back pain (LBP).

Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: PubMed was searched from 01/01/2010 to 31/12/2016 using search terms physical therapy or rehabilitation and low back pain. The search was filtered to free full text and systematic reviews. The analysis considered SRs that investigated the effectiveness of a specific physical therapy treatment (including all interventions consisting of movement, posture, physical agents, mobilization and manipulation) on the pain and/or disability of patients with LBP. Included reviews’ methods will be analyzed for the presence of CTR search. CTR accounted for in this analysis includes metaRegister of controlled trials (mRCT), clinicaltrials.gov. and 17 primary clinical trial registries identified on the International Clinical Trial Registry Platform (ICTRP) of the World Health Organization (WHO).

Results: Among the 147 yielded results, 43 SRs were included in the analysis. After the careful inspection of the search methodology of each of the included SRs, only two (~4.65%) searched at least one of the CTR. One of which admitted to but did not disclose the record resulted from searching CTR and excluded trials with missing data while the other retrieved 27 results searching mRCT and contacted authors of trials in case of missing data.

Conclusion: Searching CTR for SRs studying the effectiveness of physical therapy treatment on low back pain is clearly neglected. Future reviewers of this subject are urged to consider searching CTR.